Old-fashioned cartoon movement

Have you come up with a good Moho trick? Need help solving an animation problem? Come on in.

Moderators: Fahim, Distinct Sun, Víctor Paredes, erey, Belgarath, slowtiger

Bones3D
Posts: 217
Joined: Tue Jun 13, 2006 3:19 pm
Contact:

Post by Bones3D » Fri Dec 14, 2007 11:34 am

You're still confusing the difference between upsampling and tweening. There's really no reason to animate at framerates greater than you really need.

When you upsample the framerate of your animation, the playback remains visually indistinguishable from the framerate you started with. This remains true regardless of the native framerate of the playback device used to view it.

This is the same process used for converting from film to videotape.

The process you're describing sounds more like some form of post-production tweening, which can be done, but not without a great deal of additional overhead.

The debate here is relatively pointless anyway. Whether you choose to "animate on the twos" on a 30fps timeline, or animating every frame on a 15fps timeline, the net result is identical. It still plays back 15 drawings for every one second of footage. The only difference is the number of redundant frames showing the same drawing.

As for the added benefits of "animating on the twos", it only serves to confuse the topic further in the context of this thread. Under typical circumstances, most animators would avoid locking themselves into either method and simply key the animation frames where ever best serves the sequence they're working on.

Anyway, my apologies to mortschultz for stirring up this debate to begin with. It was not my intention to have it deviate off into such a tangent.
8==8 Bones 8==8
User avatar
slowtiger
Posts: 5492
Joined: Thu Feb 16, 2006 6:53 pm
Location: Berlin, Germany
Contact:

Post by slowtiger » Fri Dec 14, 2007 12:22 pm

You're still confusing the difference between upsampling and tweening.
I don't think so.

If I animate on two's for film (end playback rate 24 fps), I draw frames # 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, and so on. In this stage it makes no difference wether my software is set to 12 fps, or to 24 fps where it displays every drawing for two frames. Material like this can safely be upsampled.

But now I wish to refine action at some point, animating some portion of that scene on one's. I add drawing # 2, 4, 6 - and this can only be done in a file which is set to 24 fps. (I'm not talking about AS here.)

The important part is: I want ones on #1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 - and I don't want inbetweens betweeen # 7, 9, 11.
When you upsample the framerate of your animation, the playback remains visually indistinguishable from the framerate you started with.
This would only be true for a multiple of the source framerate, like a conversion from 12 to 24 fpr or from 15 to 30 fps. Any odd factor results in visible degrading - although only visible for a trained eye. I am able to spot a 3:2 pulldown because for me steady movements (like pans etc) become stutters. I can see interlacing artifacts - "false inbetweens" - especially in animation.

(something like this:
Image
from the website http://www.100fps.com)

Animation is all about dynamics in motion. It is about creating the drawings which define a motion. If you only do keys and think of inbetweens as "the tedious stuff humans should leave to software", you'll never be a first-class animator.
Post Reply