Like to open an Anime school

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jitendas
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Like to open an Anime school

Post by jitendas » Tue Sep 11, 2007 3:58 pm

Hi,
Curently I am doing animations using Anime studio, I am very happy with it and now I like to open an animation school, for creating manpower. What should be my preperations.


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cribble
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Post by cribble » Tue Sep 11, 2007 6:01 pm

You're better off asking your local schooling community or something... erm... anyone else have any ideas on opening an school?
--Scott
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jahnocli
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Post by jahnocli » Tue Sep 11, 2007 7:24 pm

It's the classic quote about prostitution that comes to mind: "First you do it to please yourself, then you do it to please your friends, and finally you do it for money"

I think jitendas is at the "please your friends" stage. Get some like-minded people together and see where it goes...Difficult to maintain that commitment at a distance though.
You can't have everything. Where would you put it?
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jitendas
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Post by jitendas » Sat Sep 22, 2007 9:16 am

Thank you every body for your openions...........

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Bones3D
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Post by Bones3D » Tue Sep 25, 2007 6:14 pm

Oddly enough, I taught a brief 3D animation course for a class I was in back in my high school days. Even though the tools at the time were nowhere near as easy to use as they are nowadays, the students did manage to pick up on it within a few days and were creating basic animations of their own after about a week.

What I learned in the process, is that if you can make concepts like translation, scaling and rotation easy enough to understand, more advanced concepts like working with a timeline become much less complicated for people to grasp later on.

In my case, I started out by putting together a few pages describing each window and their respective tools using uncomplicated text next to a clear picture of each item. For example, instead of saying "horizontal" and "vertical", I'd say "top-to-bottom" and "left-to-right". (Basically words and concepts they encounter in daily life.)

It is also important that this information is made available in a printed form, rather than a PDF. This makes it much easier to follow without interrupting what's on the screen. It also gives them a clear place to jot down personal notes for quick access later on.

Next, I introduced an easy to follow series of exercises using aas few objects as possible to keep things from getting too cluttered. For example, I started out initially by having the students create a sphere and learning how to move, scale and rotate it. After that, I introduced animation by having the students repeat the previous exercise at different points on the timeline, so they could see how their actions would affect the sphere over time. Finally, I had them add a plane to act as a basic "floor" and walked them through creating a "bouncing ball" animation, using movement, scaling (for distortions at and after impact) and rotation to make the ball exhibit a convincing roll as it bounced along the floor.

Finally, after the exercises had been completed, I had the students experiment on their own while making myself available for any questions they had. This actually worked out about as well as handing any kid a box of legos and setting them loose. Some of the students created more advanced animations (like a bat hitting a baseball) using the concepts they already knew. Others, who became became comfortable with the software branched out into some of the more advanced tools, such as working with lighting to create sunset like effects to accompany their animations.

Mostly though, your results will vary with each student's level of experience and their interest (or attention span) in the concepts you're trying to teach.

My advice, is to just keep things simple to start with and observe each person you're teaching to see which ones seem more enthusiastic about what their learning. If you find any that are doing things like experimenting outside the bounds of what you're teaching, they could prove reliable as members on the team you're trying to construct, since they have already taken an interest in the tools. Once they have a better idea of which area of the tools they prefer working in, you can build up a team of people, each specializing in different tool sets. (Which is pretty much how the industry itself works.)

Likewise though, be careful not to pressure anyone into a task they don't want to do. This will often create unnecessary conflict and may prove disastrous later on. (Like a band breaking up because one of the members decided to go solo...)
8==8 Bones 8==8
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